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Reading Notes Part B- Adam and Eve

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Adam and Eve unit. Story source: King James Bible (1611): Genesis 1-2.Sent out into the world, Adam and Eve give birth to two sons, Cain and Abel. Cain, a farmer, offers God a portion of his crops one day as a sacrifice, only to learn that God is more pleased when Abel, a herdsman, presents God with the fattest portion of his flocks. Enraged, Cain kills his brother. God exiles Cain from his home to wander in the land east of Eden. Adam and Eve give birth to a third son, Seth. Through Seth and Cain, the human race begins to grow.Ten generations pass, and humankind becomes more evil. God begins to lament his creation and makes plans to destroy humankind completely. However, one man, Noah, has earned God’s favor because of his blameless behavior. God speaks to Noah and promises to establish a special covenant with Noah and his family. He instructs Noah to build an ark, or boat, large enough to hold Noah’s family and pairs of every kind of living animal while God sends a great flood to …

Reading Notes Part A- Adam and Eve

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Adam and Eve unit. Story source: King James Bible (1611): Genesis 1-2.The Book of Genesis opens the Hebrew Bible with the story of creation. God, a spirit hovering over an empty, watery void, creates the world by speaking into the darkness and calling into being light, sky, land, vegetation, and living creatures over the course of six days. Each day, he pauses to pronounce his works “good” (1:4). On the sixth day, God declares his intention to make a being in his “own image,” and he creates humankind (1:26). He fashions a man out of dust and forms a woman out of the man’s rib. God places the two people, Adam and Eve, in the idyllic garden of Eden, encouraging them to procreate and to enjoy the created world fully, and forbidding them to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.In the garden, Eve encounters a crafty serpent who convinces her to eat the tree’s forbidden fruit, assuring her that she will not suffer if she does so. Eve shares the fruit with Adam, and the two …

Topic Research

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For my project I am going to tell a story that takes place in the famous Yellowstone National Park. My hope is to have the characters all be animals, such as a fish, bear, and hawk. Each animal is unique in their own way and can observe different things-from the water, land, and air. I would like to demonstrate the changes the park has seen over the years. My research link below will help me include sacred places such as the hot springs. I also would like to include the impact the Native Americans had on the land before others visited. I have viewed a couple folklore stories that take place in the Yellowstone and focus on ghost, but they help me get a better understanding for the scene and plot that could be implemented in my own story. "Swept Over: Ghosts of the Lower Falls" does an excellent job incorporating real places within a folklore tale. https://americanfolklore.net/folklore/ghost-stories/yellowstone-ghost-stories/https://www.worldwidewriter.co.uk/native-americans-…

Feedback Strategies

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For this feedback focused blog I read the two articles Be a Mirror: Give Readers Feedback That Fosters a Growth Mindset and Five Reasons to Stop Saying "Good Job!" I enjoyed reading both of these articles and found them to be very interesting. I really enjoy reading about growth mindset and I try to implement that philosophy into my own life. The first article Be a Mirror talked about the five qualities that foster a growth mindset, be specific, focus on the what, focus on the process, make sure it can transfer, and take yourself out of the feedback. These are all created to helping give feedback on others writings which in this class is very helpful with the amount of writing we do. The second article was even better. I find today so many people are ok with being mediocre or being par, as long as they get credit or pass. This article shows readers that people need to be pushed instead of being praised for mediocrity. Within the article there are some steps for people to giv…

Reading Notes- Homer's Iliad Part B

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Homer's Iliad (retold by A. J. Church): Intoxicated by his success, Patroclus forgets Achilles‘ warning, and pursues the fleeing Trojans to the walls of Troy and would have taken the city were it not for the actions of Apollo. In the heat of the battle, though, Hector finds the disguised Patroclus and, thinking him to be Achilles, fights and (again with Apollo’ help) kills him. Menelaus and the Greeks manage to recover Patroclus’s corpse before Hector can inflict more damage. Distraught at the death of his companion, Achilles then reconciles with Agamemnon and rejoins the fray, despite knowing his deadly fate, and drives all the Trojans before him in his fury. As the ten year war reaches its climax, even the gods join in the battle and the earth shakes with the clamour of the combat. Clad in new armour fashioned specially for him by Hephaestus, Achilles takes revenge for his friend Patroclus by slaying Hector in single combat, but then defiles and desecrates his corpse for several…

Reading Notes- Homer's Iliad Part A

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Homer's Iliad (retold by A. J. Church):This epic poem is about the Trojan War which focuses on the conflict between the Greek hero Achilles and the Trojan hero Hector. To begin the tale there was a King of Sparta who had a very attractive daughter by the name of Helen. Everyone wanted to marry her, but the King made all the princes promise to be friends with whoever she choose to marry. Everything was fine until Helen's father died and a young prince by the name of Paris came and stole her away from her current husband. The Greeks, at the behest of the warrior-hero Achilles, force Agamemnon to return Chryseis in order to appease Apollo and end the pestilence. But, when Agamemnon eventually reluctantly agrees to give her back, he takes in her stead Briseis, Achilles‘s own war-prize concubine. Feeling dishonoured, Achilles wrathfully withdraws both himself and his Myrmidon warriors from the Trojan War. Testing the resolve of the Greeks, Agamemnon feigns a homeward order, but Od…

Feedback Thoughts

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The first article I selected to read on feedback spoke about John Wooden, the wines college basketball coach of all time. He has been a huge inspiration for myself not only on the playing field, but life in general. He was known for this life changing philosophy which he taught to his players at UCLA. His philosophy is continues to be shared worldwide to this day. This article focused on a study that was conducted in the 1970's, two psychologists studied Wooden. They recorded 2,300 instances of feedback, yet only 13.1 percent of feedback was emotion based. Over 75 percent of the feedback Wooden provided was purely information based. The Wooden research underscores the importance of focusing on the how in feedback, direct, actionable improvement items, stripped bare of politics as background context. https://www.waggl.com/blog/2016/05/24/the-john-wooden-approach-to-actionable-feedback/
The Second article I selected expresses how to give effective feedback that leads to a positive c…